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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 176 (some duplicates have been removed)
on that and say it's already here. so the idea that we should wait for the science to get better, i think, is just, it's too late for that. so the cat is already out of the bag. the question is what do you do now that it's in the courtroom. well, we have dualing experts. we have judges sitting in a gate keeping role who have to decide whether or not the evidence should be admissible and whether it should be permitted in a case. my view is that the more evidence that we can provide to a scrr or to a judge -- jury or to a judge in their decision makings, some objective evidence, some evidence to bolster things like a diagnosis of schizophrenia or i.q., all the better. at the same time we need the critics in the courtroom explaining the shortcomings of the science so that we don't have false evidence that is introduced or undue reliance on science that isn't quite there yet. my preference is recognize it's already there, but make sure that we have robust discussions about the validity of the science before people buy into it too much. >> yeah, i would just add that i basically agree that it's already
, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [applause] >> we eat lots of beef in america and chicken. what about horse or zebra? why don't we eat those. aren't they kind of like cows? some of you shudder at the idea and it's illegal in some places like california and illinois, and conventional wisdom is it's not right to eat a zebra or water buffalo. so how are you repulsed and want do our taste test here? a few of you. is this wrong? well, that's bunk, as the chef at beaver creek ranch in texas. beaver creek is a resort where guests pay to hunt zebra, water buffalo, and this cute animal and then they ea kill and eat it after its been cooked by a chef. so, at the ranch, people come for this. they're not schemish. >> right. 14 different varieties of animals. pick out which animal you want to hunt for and take you out, we harvest the animal, bring it back, and i took it. >> and people say it tastes good? >> of course. >> and it's actually better for you because it's leaner? >> it is. and -- i've
unhelpful concept and i think that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it could be like emotional control. it could be something like impulsivity, impulse control and you get back to the basic problem that chris who is a colleague of anita's at vanderbilt, wait he has put it, how do you distinguish and irresistible impulse from an impulse not resisted. there is a basic gray area, a difficult ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competen
much. our next speaker is the co- founder and chief scientific officer of post-it science. he heads the company's goal team that has for more than three decades. he has been a leading pioneer in brain plasticity research. in the late 1980's, he was responsible for inventing something that i hope to own on my own, and in plans to approve my hearing. in 1996, he was the founder and ceo of scientific learning corporation, which markets and distributes software that applies principles of brain plasticity to assist children with language learning in reading. we are plowing -- proud to have him join us today to take part in this forum. [applause] >> thank you. i want to one-upping the mayor and say that today is my 70th birthday. [applause] still alive and raising cain. i also want to say that i am a proud citizen of this city and a public servant at the university of california, in this city for more than 45 years. it is wonderful to be here and wonderful to be with you today. i want to say, before i start, that you should understand that i was permitted by the university of california o
of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30, 45, or 91 bus. the garden was designed by thoma
that were based on ray sufrpgs -- observations. the science is poor. we have been living with that ever since. in the process we have obesity epidemic diabetes increased four fold. the usda the food guy pyramid might have gotten it right why is obesity and diabetes increasing so quickly? >> you are a science journalist. you are an md you went to stanford residency at johns h hopkins yet the nutritionnal instruction you got wasn't good? >> i thought it was. i followed it myself and told everybody around me to try to follow it. about two or three years ago i was 40 pounds over weight and prediabetic exercising 3 hours a day and eating all of the right food supposedly. it had me questioning what it was i was believing and what it was i was preaching. >> increase carbohydrates, reduce fat from 40 to 30 percent. this was based on research that led to the lathes food pyramid that told us to eat lots of breads then vegetable fruit less meat and milk now michelle obama has her new version out called my play. it is comforting to know this is all based onset elled science. the producer found this
students in much more than just english and math. they are committed to science and social studies, arts, and other enrichment opportunities for all of our students. even in our mostpkñ?ñ? historicy underserved schools, schools that previously wereÑññ?ñ? underachieving, the following examples illustrate in concrete terms the district -- to educating the entire child. framework has encouraged non-fiction reading especially in science and social studies. schools have purchased additional books with the funds available and material tolqñ?ñ? support student learning in all of the -- our school improvement grantrñ?ñ? leveraged resources e permitted us to make significant investments in technology and hardware that is being used across the curriculum. and in particular these investments further have>éñ?ñ? enhanced student interaction and engagement with science and social studies and even the arts curriculum. student funding has permitted the school to hire additional pe teachersióñ?ñ? while providing n planning relief time for classroom teachers to continue to collaborate. it
a hybrid between electrical engineering and computer science because it world has many different sectors and you want to be versatile. you don't want to -- well, some of us would prefer to be experts in one field. for example programming or making robots, but i think being versed in both sides of the spectrum tells you tremendously understanding programming, electronics, signal processing, networking, chip design -- i could go on and on, and i think this will give us more opportunities in the area rather than being skilled in one thing. now i'm a senior and i am graduating in the spring, fingers crossed and i couldn't have made a better choice. i think computer engineering was the best choice for me. like i said opportunities are not always readily available. we all get nervous about that. sometimes we need to take charge and take those opportunities so last summer i decided to take it a step further and i applied for probably about 200 different interning opportunities that i saw available on craigslist and on company websites, on government websites and i got lucky a few of them c
or -- yeah? >> i believe so, is that true? yes, my science advisors, that's why they're here. >> [inaudible]. >> yeah. there are a lot of carcinogens in diesel exhaust, yeah. >> [inaudible]. >> well, you're still seeing an oil that combusts, some of them we know burn more cleanly than others but if it's combusting, you end up with productions of combustion, it may not be better for pollution on the other side, depending on how clean the air burns and that's a theme we end up talking about a fair bit unfortunately is that bio doesn't always mean it's safer, it can, it can definitely mane we're reducing destruction of greenhouse gases but it can still make bad things outs of good ingredients if you know what i mean, another outdoor thing is to reduce your reliance on household pesticides so the active ingredients can be of concern, the pesticide itself, but most pesticide companies done label what are called the inert ingredient, that's the one that's not doing the pest killing per se, they can still really be bad chemicals, endocrine sdrukt tersest can be there, your baby crawls on your lawn
is cyber bullying and the top scholars in the country and in social science and psychology that saying that, so that's an important distinction so thank you both so much. >> and there is that and -- there's a balance between -- i mean when i hear that bullying is going down i mean all of us should rejoice because that to me is indicative of the fact of the work in communities across the country are starting to pay off, but it's going to be hard in this ark and we are in this area and people are coming forward, kids are coming forward . suicides that would have been kept forward or not reporting and we're learning thanks to rapid fire and thanks to social networking or facebook and this is a sued -- all of this the -- the volume of bullying is going to rise in proportion with i think the actual drop in occurrences so to balance that and be aware of that i think is important. >>i totally agree, and that's really to rosylyn's point about this being a very, very important moment and we need to did it right. just on the subject of suicide the surgeon general came out this week and there was a
into san francisco. in addition we have a tourist sector going on, life sciences going on. everybody is innovating in the right places and doing it here in san francisco and there is a strong spirit and we will continue growth and jobs everybody. we want to help everybody out and support each other and that comes to what we do here in san francisco. today i am announcing a new initiative and clean tech sf initiative which we launching with all of you. there are three part it is of this. the first part is we're working with the california clean energy fund. i know jeff anderson is here today as part of them and he's going to be partners with us, and he's partners in every branch that we doing. the first thing we're doing as clean tech sf we will establish innovation zones in san francisco. what does that mean? we asked last time when we were here in san francisco and how can we help? perhaps we can help with the resources that the city doesn't use to the highest use. let's take our space. we have a lot of assets under utilized. how can we allow the demonstrations that you'r
the best science to assess safety, so not old science but new science, would seek to protect vulnerable populations like we talked about way back when, right, prenatally and in pregnancy, those ones that are maybe more vulnerable to chemical exposures and also to reduce exposures in communities with unfair burden of exposures, we know that very often, poor communities, communities of color, communities with less resources are exposed to higher levels of chemicals so we have to reduce that unfair burden because they already have enough unfair burden, so that calls for some comprehensive changes and we want to see those happen. the senate is not likely to reconvene and vote on this bill because we are winding down of course with this legislative session and this particular administration in terms of senates turning over, they're all -- most of them are up for re-election, house is turning over -- about half of them are up for re-election and of course presidential election as well, and so it is very likely of course that this will be reintroduced after all of those changes take effect and
'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. n you take a closer look.... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common. they have teachers... ...with a deeper knowledge of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this.  is bigger than we think ... sometimelike the flu.fer from with aches, fever and chills- the flu's a really big deal. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-counter remedies. prescription tamiflu attacks the flu virus at its source. so don't wait. call your doctor right away. tamiflu is prescription medicine for treating the flu in adults and children one year and older whose flu symptoms started within the last two days. before taking tamiflu tell your doctor if you're pregnant, nursing. have serious health conditions, or take
is what about the science shows it is. but he's doing this interesting thing where he's claiming to say the same thing that obama said about this. what obama was asked about was how do you explain to your daughters that you know, you're a christian. christianity said it took six days for the earth to be created. how do you explain that to your daughters. obama went on a theological question, we don't know how long six days is. i believe in the science obama has said millions of times, we should teach geology and evolution in science class and if you want to teach intelligent design and other theories, do it in religion class. and the important part with rubio is while he does seem to be tempering his first line now with mike allen yesterday after he got a lot of criticism for it he still believes fundamentally that you should teach creationism alongside evolution in classes. that's really where this comes from. his history when he was in florida as a state house speaker was a huge fight over evolution education in
. >> the gifts parents can buy now that will make the kids go crazy on christmas morning. the science of picking the right toy. as a parent, i can tell you. look at that. so excited. nothing like seeing that unabashed joy on your child's face. this is all? >> christmas is about the kids and those moments right there. do we lose it as we get older? >> totally. >> here is your gift card. first, the major concerns among u.s. leaders about the civil war still raging in syria. reports say clashes between government forces and rebels are flaring around the capital of damascus. >> concerns are escalating abut possible use of chemical weapons, a step president obama warned syria not to take. abc's martha raddatz has more. >> reporter: hillary clinton overseas trying to find some diplomatic way to end this increasingly dangerous conflict. 20 months of fighting, 40,000 lives lost, and now the chilling possibility of an air attack with deadly nerve agents. >> there is no question that we remain very concerned that the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> reporter: a senior u.s. o
slightly, up 2.8% in math, 5.3% in science, and a half percent in reading. leticia long attributes improvements in her son's school to the teacher involveses. >> it seems like classes are more consistent, that they're all kind of operating towards the same kind of core curriculum standards which creates, i think, a better experience for the kids. >> reporter: this fall, 988 teachers, about a quarter of the total staff, received a top rating, making them eligible for the highest bonus. that's about 300 more than last year. sharyl attkisson, cbs news, washington. >> jarvis: as of today, a new law protects north carolina teachers from cyber-bullying by student who use the internet to intimidate or torment school employees. the a.c.l.u. plans to challenge the law saying school kids have been making nasty remarks about teachers since the beginning of time. and after five decades of service, a legendary american warship leaves the fleet. that's next. chiefs football player shot and killed his girlfriend today. then he drove to the team's stadium and committed suicide in front of his coac
of sciences, shakespeares garden was designed in 1928 by the california spring blossom association. flowers and plants played an important part in shakespeares literary masterpieces. here is an enchanting and tranquil garden tucked away along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. appreciate the beauty of its unique setting. the cherry tree, the brick walkways, the enchanting stones, the rustic sundial. chaired the
in the christian science monitor noted that when he passed in the street, the young men would call out, hello, chris. they knew his face. would laugh and say hello always. this is the right way to deal with our people, he said. libyan friends said he was always ready to put his country first. he shone by being himself, interested in the lives of ordinary people. his death was met with shock and sadness in libya. feelings with regard to americans that are rare in that part of the world these days. for me that judgment captures key characteristics of chris and his approach to life and work. secretary of state hi
learning to bubble in a multiple choice response. it is not literature, science, innovation, or creativity. it is not innovation. we need rigor and imagination. you need both. you have the left hand and the right hand. we have to combine those things. in california, we create innovation by ab32, but the only state with the cap and trade program, we create it by cutting regulation. i had to fire two incumbent people in our division of conservation. there were blocking oil exploration. i fired them and the oil permits for drilling went up 18%. we have to work on many levels. we're promoting efficiency. we're promoting and renewable energy and climate change -- i take courage change very seriously. we have got to do with it and there is a lot of resistance. but we deal with that through enlightened government policies, feedback, and changing them when we find they do not work. and encouraging the private sector where the ideas come up. i do not think -- steve jobs working in his career came up with stuff. i did not know that steve jobs was working in that group on the computer. we want to hav
. >> this is the largest gathering of scientists in the world. we cover all aspects of earth and space science. oceans, atmospheres, the solid earth. climate. >> reporter: four new observeries, using ground moisture sensors to gps satellites. >> they look up into the heart of the storms. a mile up in the atmosphere. >> one is being built this month to monitor pineapple express winder storms caused by atmospheric rivers. >> if we know the start time and the end time and we know how long it will last, that will likely predict 75% accuracy of the precipitation that is likely to occur. >> reporter: scientists tell us knowing how much rain is coming enables them to predict which areas will flood. reporting live in san francisco, david stevenson, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> los angeles mayor mayor antonio villaraigosa got involved in the labor dispute at the port of los angeles long beach. talks went nowhere over the weekend. mayor antonio villaraigosa wants around the clock bargaining with the help of a mediator. >>> the city counsel will discuss a plan to sell a parcel of land to a developer. the parcel is u
episodes would have a greater pain tolerance, the documented science regarding that point is inconclusive what is ininclusive is the severe threat to their vital health that is posed by tasing such an individual. >> three, in portland just a few weeks ago, a settlement was reached after a september department of justice decision against the portland police for the misuse of tasers, specifically against people with mental elth issues. the plea bargain will cost 5.4 million annually including cit and including housing and treatment. and including 180 day deadline for internal affairs and a limit for complaints against the police must be heard. >> number 4 is that the lawsuits will happen. the draft policy i have read over the police draft policy multiple times and they do not cover the recent ninth circuit decisions they do not cover the holes in the law where san francisco would be liable and 9th circuit has heard by far the majority of the cases 190, cases that is 27.4 percent of all federal cases. >> thanks. >> national population. >> thank you. >> finally. >> could you share with us you
what this does for this region. you know the bay area has become the blue angels of science. we do lots of stunts, and we are very successful at doing those stunts and we do them at high speeds, and between this project and the project for cal train to electifiy it over the next seven years $3 billion is going to be spent regionally on transit here, and we can say thank you to the secretary of transportation and to the regional transit authorities who have create thursday opportunity for the transportation. >> >> that will create a 22nd century of transit for the tronst century of jobs so thank you to secretary lahood and thank you to the leadership for all that we have accomplished here today. [applause] >> peter rogof was dominated to serve in the federal administration by the department of transportation in 2009 by president barack obama. he has over see the disbursement throughout the country through the american reinvestment act and has done so meeting every milestone established by that act. getting money into hands of transit operators whose budgets were severely strained
. the real obstacle to job growth is having the best education system, particularly in the s.t.e.m. sciences. we implement many of the environmental policies. where the rubber hits the road is that you have to get results. the reason we are winning races is that we have democratic governors who not only balance budgets and understand they have to be fiscally responsible but we combine that with an imaginative vision on insuring that we get it right when it comes to technology, making sure we have a trained work force so that we can be the job creators and the folks that seem incomes rise -- see incomes rise. when we talk to candidates, we go for the job creators. >> when you look specifically to the 2014 elections, especially in the midwestern states where republicans have a pretty large victories in 2010, what is your overarching argument against those republican governors? they have led to charges that that anger the democratic base. will that be the basis of your message to unseating some of those governors? >> here is the state that produces the automobiles for america that with out pres
the museum and the california academy of sciences, shakespeares garden was designed in 1928 by the california spring blossom association. flowers and plants played an important part in shakespeares literary masterpieces. here is an enchanting and tranquil garden tucked away along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. appreciate the beauty of its unique setting. the cherry tree, the brick walkways, the enchanting stones, the rustic sundial. chaired the bards'w ro -- share the bard's words. the garden is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, enjoy the sunshine and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare float you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. shakespeares garden is 8ada accessible. this park is located at the bottom of a hill. it is a secret garden with an infinite and captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, one block from the bottom of lombard street, it makes the top of our list for the most intimate picnic settings. avoid all tourist cars an
in the journal environmental science and technology found stuffing in more than 100 sophomore f hu00 the country found that 85% contained potentially hazard downs chemicals. >> they're coming out of the couches into air and dropping into dust. >> reporter: these chemicals were first used to meet requirements in california saying that the upholstery must sustain a flame for 15 seconds. among the chemicals found where were pbdes, voluntarily phased out in 2004 after the epa expressed concern that they were toxic to both humans and the environment. and a toxic ban from children's sleep wear in the 1970s. an environmental advocacy group found the tests it commissioned found high levels of tris in 16 upholstered products. but the midwesteamerican chemis counsel say that it provides time -- a furniture trade group says it's not aware of any evidence including in the sofa study linking the retard ands in furniture as a home health problem. additional research is needed for the sole purpose of meeting california's strict standards. the treadway's say for them, finding this ecofriendly douch was worth it
of students. computer science class saw a man on a rampage take out a teacher. that teacher saved lives in the very last moments of his life. >> and neighborhoods evacuated. people forced to wait out a toxic situation after a train derailment sends hazardous chim -- chemicals in the air and ground. a new theory of what led to a chain of rail cars jumping off of the track. take a look. um... uh... um... hm... umm... uh... oh ! the windows phone 8x by htc on verizon. it features easy to navigate live tiles that are simple to customize. just pin what matters most right to your homescreen. exclusively with data sense-- a feature that makes the most of you plan. only on verizon. now we need a little bit more... [ male announcer ] at humana, we understand the value of quality time and personal attention. which is why we are proud to partner with health care professionals who understand the difference that quality time with our members can make... that's a very nice cake! ohh! [ giggles ] [ male announcer ] humana thanks the physicians, nurses, hospitals, pharmacists and other health professio
the lives of several of his students. james crumb who was a computer science teacher was teaching friday when a man burst into his classroom, shooting the instructs for in the head with a hunting bow. crumb tackled the man giving students time to escape. more shock, police say the attacker was the teacher's own son. and before the attack, the son had fatally stabbed the teach teacher's girlfriend at his home. nick wollensky has been following this story, and i know that police are praising jack crumb for his actions. >> this is something we hope never happens in this country. there are reports that at least six students were in the classroom at the time of this incident. we do know as you mentioned, the son was identified as the son of that teacher, professor jim crumb what was shot in the classroom. 25-year-old chris crumb who's been identified, entered the classroom and reportedly concealed the prosz cross bow in a blanket. he had several knives on him. police say that's when he shot, mortally wounding, shot from the cross bow injuring his father. but miraculously, the professor was ab
,000 women annually, killing one in five, 40,000 of them every year. ktvu health and science editor revealed how young women may unwittingly be putting themselves in harm's way. >> reporter: it's convenient say many young women. >> it's probably the most convenient place to put it, especially when you go out. you put your money on one breast and your phone on other. >> it's really easy to festival vibration and you can see the call really fast. >> if i'm wearing a dress i slip it in the straps or down in the center. >> reporter: maybe they should talk to tiffany frantz. her mother had misgivings. >> we never took it seriously until after she was diagnosed. >> reporter: tiffany got breast cancer at 21? >> her tumors were exactly where her cell phone had been against her bare skin for six years. >> reporter: surgeons removed tiffany's left breast. >> it's kind of coincidental. >> the dots here are where her tumors developed and her doctors said the destruction matched her cell phone. this imagine shows that the tumors were just under the surface of her skin. >> all this area right here
people sort of live those years? >> absolutely. medical science has been so great. you mentioned novartis earlier. they're on the cutting edge of figuring out therapies that will work for people like me. so, for example, in my treatment, the first medicine i took called. >> glivac wasn't working the way i wanted it to. i changed to the next generation drug and it worked very well. it has given me what is called the molecular response, which means i no longer have any bad white blood cells that can be detected in my body down to the molecular level. that's the type of response that we want to reach and hope to maintain. >> you know in the three years since being diagnosed, what has been your biggest breakthrough personally or with respect to treatment? and how the treatments happened. >> i think personally once people found out i had leukemia, it made me a lot more human to people. when you're a successful athlete, people think you can do anything at anytime. and when they find out you're susceptible to the same things that every other ordinary person is susceptible to, it kind of humanize
what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. [ engine revs ] ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] the mercedes-benz winter event is back, with the perfect vehicle that's just right for you, no matter which list you're on. [ santa ] ho, , ho, ho! [ male announcer ] lease a 2013 c250 for $349 a month at your local mercedes-benz dealer. at your local music is a universal langue. but when i was in an accident. i was worried the health care system spoke a language all i own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. d tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million ericans. that's health in numbebers. unitedhealthcare. ♪ >> all right. we've got the adp report on private sector employment. only 118,000 jobs created in november. that's in the the private sector, okay? however, clearly that was affected by the big storm, sa y sandy. should have been much higher and will have been much higher w
. >> clayton: in new york city, women waiting until they're 50 to get married or have kids, beyond science or-- >> right, right. >> clayton: is that a problem? and is marriage the traditional idea of marriage suffering because women want to go further and further into the workplace? >> the idea of traditional marriage is suffering for lot of reason. the article, wasn't the whole kit and caboodle, one aspect that i was passing on, if you will. there's certainly more to the issue, the purpose of my book, how to choose a husband. this was sort after teaser. but the whole attitude for marriage in general, for young people in particular is such a negative one and that's really the premise that i'm concerned about because when you start out thinking so negatively and taught things like never depend on a man and postpone marriage as long as possible. not that there's anything wrong with postponing it, but with that attitude you're probably going to have a self-fulfilling prophesy, but turn it around. this is a good thing. marriage, family-- >> governor huckabee on our show disagreed a little. >> oka
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 176 (some duplicates have been removed)